#ConversationStarter: First Glimpse At Alexandra Shipp As #Aaliyah.

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The first movie about Aaliyah Dana Haughton will be hitting the airwaves this November.

The folks at HipHollywood.com have the first sneak peak. Check out the teaser below.

This movie is based on the book by Christopher John Farley, “Aaliyah: More Than a Woman.” It stars Alexandra Shipp of House of Anubis and details the rise to stardom and heartbreaking end of the singer, dancer and actress.

From HipHollywood:

The Lifetime Original Film also stars Rachael Crawford and Sterling Jarvis as Aaliyah’s parents, Diane and Mike Haughton, Anthony Grant as Damon Dash, Izaak Smith as Timbaland, Elise Neal as Gladys Knight and Chattrisse Dolabaille as Missy Elliot.

Although buzz around the biopic is at an all time high, it has had a few rough patches. The family has voiced their disapproval of the project and the film’s initial star, Zendaya, backed out because of those concerns.

First impressions? Knowing that the family isn’t as involved will you watch?

#ConversationStarter: Beyond Politics.

First Lady Michelle Obama & Beyonce Knowles grace the cover of Vogue.

This opinion piece, Mrs. O and Beyoncé: A Problematic Love Fest?, has shown up in my social media feeds for the last couple of days so let’s start a conversation here on ‘unscripted.’

Recently, First Lady Michelle Obama and Beyoncé have been exchanging pleasantries with each other.

‘The Pink Panther’ star wrote a public letter to the First Lady expressing how grateful she is that her daughter can grow up in a world where someone in the highest office in the land resembles her.

Mrs. Obama responded to Beyoncé in a tweet, “thank you for the beautiful letter and for being a role model who kids everywhere can look up to.”

Days later People Magazine asks First Lady Obama if she could trade places with anyone in the world who would it be?

“Gosh. If I had some gift, I’d be Beyoncé, I’d be some great singer,” the First Lady responded.

The First Lady’s comment caused commentators across the web to take issue from Loop21 to The Root.com.

Now they are facing backlash from readers—The Root.com’s Demetria L. Lucas in particular.

According to Lucas, Mrs. Obama’s admiration of the pop star “sends a damaging, demeaning and dangerous message to women and girls.”

Lucas characterized Beyoncé’s success to the following:

Vibe: Meet Your New Role Models: Kandi, Tamar, Evelyn & Chrissy (Reality Stars).

She is only slightly more role model-esque than three of the four reality stars ironically gracing the current cover of Vibe. Let’s keep it funky, folks: Beyoncé’s talent — the one that’s made her a multimillionaire and a household name — is the ability to habitually line-step on the Madonna-whore dichotomy. That is to say, she has mastered the art of moving her tush like a stripper and her hips like a porn star, and she still manages to be perceived as a lady and some sort of feminist. Women who have done the same or less have faced more criticism.

Her lyrics fluctuate between empowerment lite and sending women nearly back to the June Cleaver dark ages. For every “Me, Myself and I,” “Irreplaceable” or “Love on Top,” there are songs like “Cater 2 U,” where Bey (during her Destiny’s Child days) does everything for her man, from untying his shoestrings to offering a manicure.

►Read More.

The excerpt above is what stood out to me, several of my colleagues, and many in the social media sphere.

It was a hot topic is the WUMR (one of the stations where I work) studio yesterday and both of my female counterparts brought up how she attacked what Beyoncé wears and how she dresses on stage. Both highlighted that she wears more clothing than the average back up dancer in a hip-hop video and when Lucas compares the ‘Obsessed’ actress’ songs she is comparing song lyrics from two different eras in Knowles’ life.

Before I ask for you to chime in, see what those around the web have said:

While the tweeters are outraged the facebookers run the gambit saying, ‘that’s your opinion, they’re friends, cool, next topic.’ ►See Screenshot Click Here.

Josh’s Note: To characterize the singer, the actress, the entertainer, the designer and the businesswoman— someone who put in fifteen years of hard work to get where she is in life—in the same vein as a stripper, adult film star or a reality star is beyond farfetched.

No, I do not know what message a young woman would receive from the First Lady’s praise (and Miss Lucas is entitled to her opinion).

However, I still differ in sentiment with Lucas.

As a young man, what do I see is two women who admire each other. Two women who respect each other and two women who respect each other’s profession.

What I see is the opposite what is displayed “every time a reality show airs.” Their “‘love fest’ is combating the negative images of black women who pull wigs or throw wine bottles.

____

Chime in:

Is it justifiable to compare Beyoncé to a stripper, porn star and the four on Vibe?

Readers do you think Lucas made a correct assessment of First Lady Michelle Obama’s praise for Mrs. Carter?

#ConversationStarter: Soulful Crispy Chicken Snack Wraps. Offensive or Not?

Watch the Burger King advertisement above.

The advertisement is one in a series of celebrity-centered Burger King commercials.

The others feature David Beckham and Jay Leno.

Some people have shown outrage on Twitter over Blige singing about crispy chicken and fresh lettuce feeling the ad harks back to a time when African-Americans were portrayed in a stereotypical light.

However others in the social media universe compare it to similar commercials featuring African-American actors—like Popeye’s Annie.

It was later revealed the clip seen on YouTube was an abbreviated version.

Blige released the following statement:

“I agreed to be a part of a fun and creative campaign that was supposed to feature a dream sequence. Unfortunately, that’s not what was happening in that clip,” Blige told the website. “I understand my fans being upset by what they saw. But, if you’re a Mary fan, you have to know I would never allow an unfinished spot like the one you saw go out.”

via MTV.com

According to BK spokesman Miguel Piedra, the ad has been temporarily pulled from BK’s official YouTube channel due to a licensing issue.

The company has also apologized to Blige and her fans for releasing controversial advert:

“We would like to apologize to Mary J. and all of her fans for airing an ad that was not final. We know how important Mary J. is to her fans, and we are currently in the process of finalizing the commercial. We hope to have the final ad on the air soon.”

via WSJ.com

Chime in. Is the ad offensive or not?